Module Catalogues

Finance Dissertation

Module Title Finance Dissertation
Module Level Level 4
Module Credits 20.00
Academic Year 2021/22
Semester SEM1

Aims and Fit of Module

Students should identify, define and explore one or more problems or issues at the forefront of finance as an academic discipline. This may be achieved by means of either an in-organisation project, through surveys or other methods of obtaining primary data, through collection and analysis of secondary data, or by a library-based study. The final thesis should demonstrate: (i) an analytical and critical approach to problem definition; (ii) the derivation of appropriate research questions and/or hypotheses; (iii) skills in designing and implementing a suitable methodology for gathering, analysing and interpreting data and information that address the research problem, questions and/or hypotheses; (iv) knowledge and understanding of literature and theory relevant to the area of inquiry, and the ability to apply it appropriately, and (v) the ability to write up and present the research as a dissertation in a way that combines academic depth and good scholarship with an appreciation of relevant practical and policy issues (as appropriate) in finance and its related disciplines.Students should identify, define and explore one or more problems or issues at the forefront of finance as an academic discipline. This may be achieved by means of either an in-organisation project, through surveys or other methods of obtaining primary data, through collection and analysis of secondary data, or by a library-based study. The final thesis should demonstrate: (i) an analytical and critical approach to problem definition; (ii) the derivation of appropriate research questions and/or hypotheses; (iii) skills in designing and implementing a suitable methodology for gathering, analysing and interpreting data and information that address the research problem, questions and/or hypotheses; (iv) knowledge and understanding of literature and theory relevant to the area of inquiry, and the ability to apply it appropriately, and (v) the ability to write up and present the research as a dissertation in a way that combines academic depth and good scholarship with an appreciation of relevant practical and policy issues (as appropriate) in finance and its related disciplines.

Learning outcomes

Students completing the module successfully should be able to:
A Demonstrate a substantial and systematic understanding of current and recent research, theory and advanced scholarship in the areas of finance and its related disciples that are of relevance to their research topic.
B Critically evaluate and apply knowledge and skills acquired throughout the programme to the identification and framing of specific research questions at the forefront of the finance discipline.
C Investigate questions and problems through the design and implementation of a research strategy and methodology appropriate to advanced study in their field.
D Demonstrate appropriate academic rigour in the acquisition, organisation, critical analysis and presentation of conceptual and empirical materials obtain from primary and secondary sources.
E Accurately, coherently and persuasively communicate the research project, methodology and findings in an oral presentation.
F Successfully produce a well-written, coherent and well-presented piece of work that makes an original and reflective contribution to knowledge whilst demonstrating good scholarship and conforming fully to standard academic conventions in the field of finance and its related disciplines.
G Demonstrate a sound understanding of research ethics appropriate to the research topic.
H Think, learn and work independently whilst demonstrating initiative, responsibility, self-discipline, self-motivation, self-direction and originality in tackling and solving research problems in finance.

Method of teaching and learning

Third, students are required to submit a written research proposal report at the beginning of Semester 1 (Year 2) which is summatively assessed and on which feedback is given by the Programme Director and the supervisor. The exact nature of the research proposal report will vary depending on the topic, but it is likely to include the following elements: indicative project title; introduction and background to the study; statement of intended aims, objectives and research questions; proposed data collection, analysis and research methods (including an evaluation of limitations); an overview of prior research, and current knowledge in the area of the proposed topic in the form of an outline literature review (including, if appropriate an outline theoretical framework); and a timeline for project completion. Each of these aspects will be discussed and agreed with the supervisor in advance of the student submitting the research proposal report.
Fourth, students are expected to meet with the Programme Director at the beginning of Semester 1 to discuss the status of the research project. Later in Semester 1, students will be required to make an unassessed oral presentation on the interim progress of their research in regular seminar meetings (the precise number of which depends on student enrolment figures) in order to obtain formative feedback, comment and advice from the Programme Director, supervisors and other IBSS faculty, as well as from fellow students for whom attendance is compulsory.
All this will serve to keep all parties concerned up-to-date about the research progress with a number of formal check-point mechanisms so that the supervisor and the Programme Director are in a position to provide the student with support, trouble-shooting advice and feedback should this be required. Third, students are required to submit a written research proposal report at the beginning of Semester 1 (Year 2) which is summatively assessed and on which feedback is given by the Programme Director and the supervisor. The exact nature of the research proposal report will vary depending on the topic, but it is likely to include the following elements: indicative project title; introduction and background to the study; statement of intended aims, objectives and research questions; proposed data collection, analysis and research methods (including an evaluation of limitations); an overview of prior research, and current knowledge in the area of the proposed topic in the form of an outline literature review (including, if appropriate an outline theoretical framework); and a timeline for project completion. Each of these aspects will be discussed and agreed with the supervisor in advance of the student submitting the research proposal report.
Fourth, students are expected to meet with the Programme Director at the beginning of Semester 1 to discuss the status of the research project. Later in Semester 1, students will be required to make an unassessed oral presentation on the interim progress of their research in regular seminar meetings (the precise number of which depends on student enrolment figures) in order to obtain formative feedback, comment and advice from the Programme Director, supervisors and other IBSS faculty, as well as from fellow students for whom attendance is compulsory.
All this will serve to keep all parties concerned up-to-date about the research progress with a number of formal check-point mechanisms so that the supervisor and the Programme Director are in a position to provide the student with support, trouble-shooting advice and feedback should this be required.